47 Metres Down ***

Ever since Jaws, there’s been the desire to thrill audiences with crazed, human-hunting sharks singling out victims in the water. We know sharks can bite in reality (and even kill), but sadly, since the 1975 Spielberg classic, none of the shark films have been as effective, including the Jaws sequels. These all become more and more laughable, to the point of absurdity like Sharknado.

The only film that began capturing the ‘reality’ of being in the water with one of the deep’s greatest hunters, and came close to Jaws for sheer terror, was Open Water (2003). There was believability to it that events portrayed ‘could’ happen – in fact it was based on a true story. The beauty of this film was you never got to see the crazed shark attacking. It was all below the waterline.

Last year’s Blake Lively adrenaline fest, The Shallows, got average reviews and revived our fear of Great Whites targeting us. 47 Metres Down, like Open Water and The Shallows, plays on a realistic situation you ‘could’ possibly find yourself in, especially in the middle of the Summer season. The latest film is surprisingly effective too, and cleverly throws enough curve balls to keep you entertained for the 89 mins, but doesn’t go quite far enough with the shark menacing.

Two sisters, Lisa and Kate (played by Mandy Moore and Claire Holt respectively) are on holiday in Mexico, with Lisa trying to get over a breakup back home. Befriending two lads, they decide to go on a cage-diving expedition to get up close to sharks. The problem is the equipment and cage supplied by the operator (hippie Taylor, played by Matthew Modine) is less than safe. After the boys’ turn, and the cage the sisters are now in plunges 47 metres to the ocean floor. As their oxygen begins to run out, the sisters must find a way of communicating with the surface and get rescued, while Great Whites circle them.

The setup and process in which the girls become shark bait is highly believable – this reviewer experienced faulty diving gear while in St Lucia. Writer-director Johannes Roberts plays on this possible scenario – being exposed to dubious practices as a tourist, challenging you to think what you would do in the sisters’ unfortunate situation? The filmmaker also shoots within murky surroundings, not the crystal-clear blue expanse other productions favour. This heightens the fear of ‘what’s out there’ even more.

While you will be covering your face in anticipation of an attack, squinting with one eye through your hands, the problem lies with some far-fetched parts. There are also not enough shark frights in the run-up to the next attack – ironic, considering the subject matter. As far as stretching reality, one of the sisters goes off to find a much-needed bit of kit sent down by the boat, over the edge of a ocean-floor ledge with a significant drop, and still manages to find her way back to the damaged cage, without consequence, for example.

Indeed, the premise is, after a certain time when the oxygen is near gone, so how many of situations the sisters are in are actually happening, and how many are delusions? This is where Roberts’s film gets very intriguing. It’s a shame it didn’t played on this more to heighten the disorientation at 47 metres below the surface, and elevate it out of the vanilla-acted, B-movie outcome it lapses into. It could have been a memorable psychological thriller and upped the game in this genre. The ending does have you questioning, is this really happening? Hence the plot’s main problem lies with whether 47 Metres Down is meant to be just a shark-menacing film (like Jaws), or a psychological nail-biter about disorientation (much like Open Water), with the big fish just another peril to contend with? This is where things feel a little inconsistent.

That said, 47 Metres Down will have you cowering in your seat, muttering “no, no, no, don’t do it” to either one of the women’s actions. With its twists and turns, the film does what it intends to do; make you think twice about cage diving with sharks on your holiday, or at least, demanding to see the operator’s certificates, licences and equipment before stepping onto the boat, let along the into the shark feeding cage!

3/5 stars

By @FilmGazer

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Cars 3 ***

With Cars 1 and Cars 2 always on at some point at home (with our two kids), the prospect of a third outing is inevitable, kind of a pilgrimage that must be made (parents nods in unison). In fact, we have waited six years for the latest installment, after first encountering youthful, cocky racing legend Lightning McQueen getting lost in Radiator Falls off Route 66 in 2006.

What the third film, Cars 3, highlights is how quickly time passes – McQueen is now the geriatric motor like mentor Doc Hudson (voiced by the late Paul Newman) was, making you surprisingly reminisce on what a decade has brought you? It’s this reflection that Cars 3 makers Disney Pixar want you to experience, using a cross-generational storyline.

After losing the latest speedway race to a new generation of race cars like suave winner Jackson Storm (voiced by Armie Hammer), Lightning McQueen (Owen Wilson back in the driving seat) sets out to prove he still has what it takes to win. However, his true direction is revealed after an unexpected off-track journey taken with trainer Cruz Ramirez (Cristela Alonzo).

The success (or failure) of Cars 3 really does depend on what you want from the film – and your dedication to the characters. The story has to progress – Lightning McQueen cannot race forever, as every sportsman knows too well. This is Disney too, so there has to be a happy, albeit poignant, family-friendly ending.

It’s not so much the McQueen character progression here, but whether you want action scenes verses lovable character moments for committed fans. Indeed, those craving more Mater moments will be disappointed – the Doc gets more of an outing that the goofy tow truck whose quirky quips feel a little flat. The Radiator Springs bunch – much like the second film – gets driven out as the cheerleaders once more, like spectators to their own franchise. Dwell on the (mis)fortunes of the former characters, and you get a sense of great sadness that they are being resigned to the Disney store cupboard.

This film’s hook relies on Lightning McQueen’s interaction with the new characters. Here, the studio has gone with more ‘girl power’ with Cruz – remember Emily Mortimer’s Holley Shiftwell spy car in the second film? Cruz is really peppy and great fun, but also self-doubting, which allows McQueen to give the pep talk and ‘grow up’.

What film three lacks though, is an actual adventure that the second had and kept little ones really entertained by. Indeed, there is ‘a journey’ going on, but this self-discovery version begins to feel like it’s wallowing at times, threatening to dislodge any little ones’ interest. It’s then you will the film to move on speedily to the next action scene to stop the inevitable “can we go now” line from being utter in the cinematic darkness. This happened three-quarters of the way through from a Cars-obsessed, 4.5-year-old – very telling indeed. Just be prepared.

As for action, the effects and graphics are superb especially the near-realistic mud pit in the ‘demolition derby’ race McQueen and Cruz compete in that feels like a bit of Radiator Springs nostalgia. However, it’s the first-person gamer view of the speedway racing track that really wows and gets the juices going of any speed demon watching. This wizardry shows how far the franchise has come and Disney Pixar must be commended on.

Cars 3 does have ‘something for everyone’, which is why it’s still proved so lucrative both in theatrical and home entertainment terms. This saga just forwards the narrative towards (maybe) a new fork in the Cars road map? One that doesn’t necessarily say good-bye to Radiator Springs and Route 66, but could take another interesting path…

3/5 stars

By @FilmGazer

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War For The Planet Of The Apes (3D) *****

 

If you’ve ever doubted viewing one of these films – as this reviewer has, this could be your introduction to one of the most thought-provoking ‘man verses beast’ films of present-day cinema. Through the magic of digital technology, War For The Planet Of The Apes manages to transport you from ‘human to ape’ then makes you question our species’ impact on nature around us. All of this comes to brew in a rocky microcosm of human suffering. It’s that powerful that is makes you think long afterward viewing. Throughout, you are too busy willing the apes to survive and save the planet.

Having followed Caesar’s journey from his intelligent ape origins, in the third chapter, he (Andy Serkis returning) and his apes are forced into a deadly conflict with an army of humans led by a ruthless Colonel (played by Woody Harrelson). After the apes suffer unimaginable losses, Caesar wrestles with his darker instincts and begins his own mythic quest to avenge his kind. As the journey finally brings them face to face, Caesar and the Colonel are pitted against each other in an epic battle that will determine the fate of both their species and the future of the planet.

Believe the hype: Serkis is superb in this, leaving no emotion unexplored, and becoming more ‘civilised’ and messiah-like than any human could hope to be. You are completely won over to his side, his morality and view on the world, along with his ‘apes in arms’ (Karin Konoval as Maurice, Terry Notary as Rocket and Michael Adamthwaite as Luca).

The most powerful scenes are Serkis’s Caesar verses Harrelson’s Colonel. Initially, both feel as though they are playing to stereotype, but both character arcs are way more subtle, surprising and ultimately satisfying than that, as both have darker and lighter shades to their nature, which the film always pauses to reflect on. These muted moments, however, are never to the detriment of the film’s urgency and pace. They merely add greater value.

There are also some wonderful companionship and group-bonding moments among apes – and ‘token’ primate, a young mute girl called Nova (Amiah Miller) who is there for ‘cute’ value and to shine a light on the apes’ sensitive nature. In scenes that resemble The Great Escape and Schindler’s List, the apes are resourceful, considerate and in destructible in what is thrown at them. It is all-engrossing. Director Matt Reeves and team never forget to lighten the emotional load, with a charmingly funny turn by Steve Zahn as the comedic Bad Ape, the character that actually makes the greatest progression in hindsight.

As for big-screen effects, some of the jungle scenes are spectacular, especially when Caesar firsts encounters the Colonel at the waterfall. Details that could have been lost in the dim tones are all present and alive, feral, even down to the emotions in the eyes between man and beast. This is a production that does not squander its budget, making use of every effect, production design and vista.

War For The Planet Of The Apes concludes in the only way possible, squeezing out one last emotional response from the viewer. As Hollywood endings go, it’s as expected, almost clichéd. However, the full impact of what you have just watched hits you like a tidal wave soon after. It’s the unexpected that renders War For The Planet Of The Apes one of the most powerful post-viewing experiences in a long time.

5/5 stars

By @FilmGazer

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Spider-Man: Homecoming (3D) ****

Everyone who is interested in Spider-Man (and Marvel) films is looking forward to seeing new Spider-Man, Tom Holland, going solo on screen and in action. Thankfully, Holland held his own in last year’s Captain America: Civil War and he doesn’t disappoint in Homecoming.

Peter Parker/Spider-Man’s nemesis is Vulture (Adrian Toomes, played by Michael Keaton), who is also related to Peter’s love interest. Toomes has built a lucrative weapons empire that involves an alien power source, with all weaponry sold to the highest criminal bidder. Wanting to prove to his mentor, the great Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.) that he is Avenger material, Spider-Man goes after Toomes/Vulture, while trying to juggle life as a high-school student, with best friend, nerd Ned (Jacob Batalon), with being a superhero.

Homecoming is packed with fun and big action, and has some brilliant lines. The reason it works so well is Holland is as cheeky-chappie and quick-witted as big-timers, Keaton and Downey Jr., thanks to some great writing from Jonathan Goldstein and co. Admittedly, Andrew Garfield paved the way with a more ‘playful’ Spider-Man character, but Holland’s version feels less ‘troubled’ and more proactive like a meddling, naïve youngster should be. This nicely compliments Stark’s infantile antics, and actually renders the latter (almost) a ‘grown-up’ in this. That said an old flame makes a fun appearance half-way through and reinforces Stark’s unpredictability that fans so love.

There is also just one superhero in action verses an almost retro bad buy in Keaton’s character that doesn’t result in Marvel hero fatigue half-way through, with superpowers verses superpowers clashing. Here, it’s man (with webs, admittedly) verses man with gadgets. Therefore, the battles feel more bruising and energizing.

Cop Car director Jon Watts – who takes the directing helm for the first time here – has brought out Spider-Man’s human vulnerabilities, but rather than dwell on these like a Garfield-era hero would have, Holland’s incarnation refuses to let them get the better of him. In a way, it’s a little like watching Kick-Ass self-destruct at times but get back up again. Keaton is always better playing the villain – even his Batman was unhinged. It’s what the actor is best at and he can indulge once more here.

Along with some explosive action set-pieces, the well-crafted Homecoming is one of the best Spider-Man films yet, ending with one of the best lines of any film in a long time that will have you chucking a long time after. Stay for the ‘infomercial’ during the end credits too, for a little more Marvel titillation.

4/5 stars

By @FilmGazer

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Despicable Me 3 ***

The thought of another Minions-packed film might have us parents running for the hills. Anyone who’s been subjected to (tortured by) the Minions Banana song by their offspring will be nodding in agreement right now. It takes a strong stomach to take the kids to Despicable Me 3.

Fear not though: Film number 3 is far less about the little yellow babbling creatures and more about ex-villain Gru and his family connections and choices. This is both a plus and a minus for the franchise.

Bad-turned-good Gru (voiced by Steve Carrell) and wife Lucy (Kristen Wiig) have been fired from the Anti-Villain League (like the FBI) for reasons played out at the beginning. Meanwhile, the redundant Minions decide life with Gru is no longer fun and decide to go it alone. Wondering what to do next, Gru is contacted by his long-lost twin Dru (Carrell) who wants him to go back into the family business: villainy – something the latter needs help with. The plan is to steal a diamond that another baddie has locked away, 80s-loving supervillian Balthazar Bratt (Trey Parker). Can both brothers work together and resurrect the glory days?

Although writers Cinco Paul and Ken Daurio have wisely tried another way of injecting a new lease of life into the Despicable Me saga with the brothers’ relationship and how that impacts on Gru’s family, the original fans of the films – the youngsters – do begin to question when they’ll be seeing more Minions action, which this film is light on. Granted, a prison break by the yellow menace satisfies for a short period, but any mini Minions nuts out there will be asking during the film when are their custard-coloured anti-heroes coming back onscreen next?

For the rest of us, there is enough to entertain you with, watching the family dynamics in play. Even though the makers have give adults a Minions respite by exploring this, the real fun comes from Bratt and his 80s obsessions, which allows those of us who remember those days first time around to indulge in 80s fever, bringing silly grins to faces at the campness of the decade and its fashions and music. It feels like a cheap laugh but it’s gratefully accepted. The rest of the film flies around at its usual colourful pace, without much else standing out.

Despicable Me 3 feels like the ‘third best’ in the saga – in all fairness, it’s just trying something new with the narrative and characters. If you like Gru and family then this will go down easily and effortlessly. If you actually ‘like’ Minions, you might be putting on a previous film when you get home to get your fill – as this reviewer did to placate a young (slightly disappointed) Minions fan.

3/5 stars

By @FilmGazer

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Transformers: The Last Knight (3D) **

Relax folks, it’s Michael Bay back again for the fifth time to assault our senses. Go into Transformers: The Last Night with this in mind, and the outcome isn’t as painful as you might expect. There is less mangled mental in colourful whirl than in previous films – and this one is mildly better than the last. Indeed, love or hate him, Bay is a master at crafting an action blockbuster for the supersized screen, which is why people come back for more. It’s got nothing to do with plot and character development.

Action stalwart Mark Wahlberg returns for more of a beating as engineer and ‘inventor’ Cade Yeager who is in hiding from the Transformers Reaction Force, a military-run operation tasked with ridding the planet of Transformers. Yeager has a few hiding out in his scrap metal yard, including Bumblebee, right-hand robot to the Autobot’s leader, Optimus Prime (who keeps telling us he’s ‘Optimus Prime’ throughout, in case we missed it).

The latter is forced against his will to find the key – something to do with mythical wizard Merlin – to bringing Prime’s dead home planet, Cybertron, back to life, while Megatron and his Decepticons wait to destroy him and his crew. The problem is, in bringing Cybertron back, Earth must perish. It’s up to Yeager, an English history professor (Laura Haddock) and their allies (including Anthony Hopkins as Sir Edmund Burton, Josh Duhamel as ever embattled Colonel William Lennox and John Turturro as the exiled but returning Agent Simmons) to save our planet.

In a similar vein to the Fast and Furious franchise – both boast machines, babes and gravity-defying stunts (for humans), Transformers still fills cinema seats. The answer is in the easily digestible format as listed. You can switch off and go ‘oooo and ahhh’ at the spectacle, like being on an overpriced rollercoaster seat – and it affects the eyeballs too. If that’s not your bag, it isn’t going to delight or get any better. In fact, it’s going to be painful. That is where the problem lies in critics expecting greater things from Bay – he actually gives you what you crave in terms of an action blockbuster fix, nothing else.

Transformers is an utterly daft franchise, made crazier this time in The Last Knight by the excruciating upper-class English caricatures that are both ridiculous and unrealistic – much like its battle scenes. It always prompts much head scratching when humans believe firing rounds of bullets and rockets at superior alien life forms would eliminate the threat. Eventually they hit the bullseye, after some bright spark figures out how to.

The fact that writers Art Marcum, Matt Holloway and Ken Nolan believe linking the kingdom of Camelot and the Knights of the Round Table to the Transformers’ history is farcical in itself – like a last bid attempt at making the story franchise credible. If you can absorb and overcome this absurdity, it’s even more entertainingly silly to watch – a fact the cast seem to have grasped.

Wahlberg is designed for such films, returning for more. His character is always agreeable, testosterone-fuelled and smart-mouthed enough to get you on side. Like Fast and Furious, there are some nice motors to ogle too – in addition to pouty Haddock who is a Megan Fox clone, however unfair that is to the Brit actress. There is also the (frankly) pointless casting of young Isabela Moner as ‘Transformer protector’ Izabella, perhaps for the younger audience, but sinisterly ‘over sexed’ (and pouty) to set off parents’ alarm bells of 12 year-olds. Again, it’s Bay’s Fox obsession filtering through…

Transformers: The Last Night (3D) – seen in 3D but not necessary to be – is much of the same with a plot out of a Dan Brown novel, if you think of the secret society aspect. The familiar faces slog on to the last; indeed, the ending points to installment six. Yes, another Transformer siege is in the planning, and if you haven’t got fatigue already, there’s a Bumblebee spin-off too. If that grates by the end of this film, Optimus Prime telling us he’s, well, Optimus Prime, then be prepared for the onslaught of the bleedin’ obvious in round six. You just can’t keep a Transformer down, it seems.

2/5 stars

By @FilmGazer

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My Cousin Rachel ****

Daphne du Maurier novels are primed for screen use – just take Rebecca, The Birds and Don’t Look Now, for example. After all, she was a master of intrigue, dark imagination, and open endings, and was one of Hitchcock’s favourites to adapt. Hence, the second big-screen incarnation of My Cousin Rachel (the first made in 1952, starring Olivia de Havillard and a young Richard Burton) ought to be an enticing affair, starring Rachel Weisz this time around. It is, and just as moody in production as in acting as any ‘period film noir’ should be. It also retains the mystery right up until the very last frame, which some might find utterly frustrating.

After the sudden death of his beloved cousin/father figure in Italy, young Englishman Philip (Sam Claflin) begins to plot revenge against his cousin’s widow, the enigmatic and beautiful Rachel (Weisz), believing foul play at his cousin’s demise. He waits for Rachel’s imminent arrival, after news that she is to settle in England on her husband’s estate – which Philip has been running and will inherit at on his 25th birthday. However, the more Philip gets to know her, the more he falls for her charm and individuality. But what are Rachel’s real intentions?

The ‘did she, didn’t she’ yarn is engrossing enough to have you hooked throughout and continually looking for clues to solve the mystery. At the same time, it almost makes excuses for some of the lesser explained sub plots that writer-director Roger Michell leaves ‘hanging’. Perhaps, this whole mystery works because both Michell and his leads did not discuss who is to blame throughout filming? This certainly translates onto screen, as all the characters have is to react to the present situation they find themselves in, while they (and we) try working out what the devil is going on?

My Cousin Rachel cleverly swings between sympathy with and suspicion of Rachel, partly due to the great acting talents of Weisz – without her, this film might have been a non-starter. Weisz delivers just the right amount of torment and teasing, composure and melodramatics to keep you guessing, playing the full spectrum of emotion. She is entrancing to watch even when she says nothing, dressed in mournful black most of the time, like some ever-present dark menace in the room, even in her lighter moments.

Michell does make full use of the Rael Jones music score to prompt changes in mood perhaps a little too frequently, but Claflin’s ‘lesser acting experience’ compared to Weisz’s actually plays to his character’s advantage in dealing with the more worldly-wise woman. Claflin says he did not know what Weisz’s next move would be on set and this certainly shines through.

The actual surprise for those fans of Austen and Dickens-adapted films is the modern vein of humour coursing through it, even the language that My Cousin Rachel employs – cue the moment Philip’s butler deals with men wrongly dressing the Christmas tree. This is a feature of du Maurier’s written word which Michell has captured well, and it feels quite in place and ‘fresh’, punctuating languishing moments in such a period drama, even though the time’s decorum is still maintained.

Game of Thrones’ star Iain Glen and Holliday Grainger are brilliant support to Claflin’s Philip as the Kendalls (father and daughter), who worry about his position and mental health. As onscreen mentors and wiser figures, even they are susceptible to Rachel’s lure, making for an intriguing dynamic.

My Cousin Rachel is a curious one to describe to those who haven’t seen it. It creeps up on you slowly and makes you think before frustrating the hell out of you in the end. It has love, mystery, drama and comedy, without all the stuffiness of period drama that might turn some off. It is a period ‘coming-of-age’ film too, where the ‘bad guy’ is female – or is she? Is she just very independent and sexually liberated for her time? As Philip asks in the end: who is to blame? Perhaps, that’s where du Maurier’s opening line in the novel might help: “They used to hang men at Four Turnings in the old days”… You decide.

4/5 stars

By @Filmgazer

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Rock Dog ***

Another animation, another animated ‘hero’ full of good intentions, this time the moral in Rock Dog is: ‘follow your dreams and don’t let anyone deter you’, with talking animals, akin to Zootropolis. It’s not the latter though (unfairly judged against a larger studio release in some respects), but has its own indie charm, full of funny, cute moments. What is does have is a highly catchy theme tune in ‘Glorious’, which the kids were humming all the way out of the cinema and down the street afterwards. In that respect, it makes its mark through music.

After a radio falls from the sky, guitar-loving Tibetan Mastiff Bodi (voiced by Luke Wilson) hears rock music for the first time from ‘superstar rocker’ Angus Scattergood (voiced by Eddie Izzard), and realises his dream is to be a musician. That goes dead against what his father, guard dog Khampa (voiced by J.K. Simmons) wants for him – he ought to be guarding the sheep of the village against their ancient enemy, the wolves. Khampa reluctantly lets his son go to the big city to fulfill his dream – and maybe meet Scattergood in the flesh.

Rock Dog has some good-hearted, fun characters to ride along with, and a certain easy charm that makes it totally consumable. Although Bodi is the star and certainly resonates with the kids, Scattergood is for the adults. Izzard is hilarious as the cat ‘music demi god’ who finds most things in life tedious and has run out of inspiration. He is the epitome of ‘Brit music cool’ though and that alone is enough to make him a memorable character.

Indeed, the plot can be seem coming a mile off before the film has even started – we know Bodi will be successful, somehow. The film is about the journey he takes, with its quaint innocence from not only Bodi but also the sheep. It’s also a refreshing take, set in the Tibetan hills, from the usual city affair, though it ends up in the Big Smoke.

The other thing is it is all good clean fun for a younger child to watch – even though it involves a rock star. Even the wolves are not too scary for youngsters (not jumping in mum/dad’s lap this time), and are like poor imitations from a tame Guy Ritchie gangster flick (minus any swearing). Centre stage is given to the fledgling Bodi-Scattergood relationship, and the highs and lows of it. In that sense, kids get to see humility in the end, in addition to the rise to stardom.

Rock Dog has a lot of lessons for all viewers of all ages to learn from – after all, it’s never too late for anyone to follow a dream. Some of the humour is a little slapstick and déjà vu, but utterly harmless, nevertheless. It will make you walk away with a smile and a hum, so that’s not a bad thing.

3/5 stars

By @FilmGazer

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Baywatch ****

This could have been an expensive gamble that didn’t pay off. Seth Gordon has guided the reboot of popular TV series Baywatch onto the big screen with expertise, making sure there are oodles of silliness, as well as buff bodies clad in red Lycra to enjoy. Position popular actor Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson at the helm – who has proved his ease at moving between comedy, family and adventure films, and there is a recipe for success.

Johnson plays the iconic character, lifeguard Mitch Buchannon, brought to life on TV by David Hasselhoff (who makes a cameo in this). While butting heads with cocky new recruit Matt Brody, played by Zac Efron, who used to be an Olympic swimming champion, fallen on hard times due to booze, Buchannon uncovers a criminal plot headed by hotelier mogul Victoria Leeds (Priyanka Chopra) that threatens the future of the bay.

Never throughout its 116 minutes run-time does Baywatch ever drop its tongue-in-cheek stance and try to be anything more than a current send-up of the TV series. This is ALL about delivering fun, fun and more fun, along with plenty of action and undercurrents of serious social topics. Just take Jon Bass’s Ronnie character’s embarrassing ‘entanglement’ on a beach lounger, and how Buchannon and co deal with that particular ‘rescue’, and you get the gist. Think Judd Apatow does Baywatch in fact. Every scene mocks the pseudo seriousness of the TV drama, so it’s a tonic to watch if you were a fan.

Johnson and Efron make a great team – alpha male verses alpha male, which, interestingly, turns into a father-son relationship of mutual appreciation. This is played below the radar as not to revert from the campness going on – no surprises there really. Of course the females play second fiddle to the male leads – as expected, but all characters are there to be ogled, precisely the incentive of the TV show. The girls just get to tease more in this. The fact the baddie is a femme fatale stereotype is nothing new either, but Chopra is a sultry delight in the role, like watching any Bond villain at play on a Baywatch set.

It’s important to remember Baywatch is not out to smash stereotypes but embrace and mock them for pure pleasure. It’s self-depreciating too, allowing anything to happen without judgment. Throw in some explosions (and fireworks), stunts and pecs and buts, plus a strong cast who deliver comedy effortlessly, and it’s one of the best box office nights out on offer at present – something that surprised even this reviewer!

4/5 stars

By @FilmGazer

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